Global New Light Of Myanmar

Paper mache elephants at Voices for Momos event sets new world record

People enjoy elephant sculptures displayed at Maha Bandoola Park near Sule Pagoda in downtown Yangon. Photo: Supplied
People enjoy elephant sculptures displayed at Maha Bandoola Park near Sule Pagoda in downtown Yangon. Photo: Supplied

World Wildlife Fund for Nature’s (WWF-Myanmar) paper elephant sculptures set the new Guinness World Record for being the largest paper mache bamboo-supported sculptures. The record was achieved at a Voices for Momos public event, when the supersized elephant was created by a talented graffiti artist and a Myanmar traditional paper mache sculptor.
The Voices for Momos campaign called on individuals and organisations to use their voices to drive awareness, education and call for an end of sales of illegal wildlife in Myanmar.
At the public event, the artists created four supersized elephants, two small elephants, and one bamboo sculpture. Among the seven sculptures, local young graffiti artist Arkar Kyaw and Myanmar traditional paper maché sculptor U Myint’s (Yote Lone Kabar) supersized bamboo-supported paper elephant without its trunk broke the Guinness World Record.
“We created this elephant sculpture to call for an end to elephant poaching and illegal wildlife trading. We are absolutely delighted to break the Guinness World Record and we would like to thank the Voices for Momos campaign for letting us be a part of this significant public awareness event,” said graffiti artist Arkar Kyaw.
The Guinness World Record’s supersized elephant sculpture is 21 feet long, 7 feet wide and 21 feet tall. The size of the elephant paper sculpture is three times bigger than the average 7 feet to 9 feet elephant.
The Asian elephant was designed with bamboo and newspapers, and donations by the public through Voices For Momos, covered the sculpture.
WWF-Myanma sculpture was displayed at Yangon’s Maha Bandula Park on 3 November as part of the Voices For Momos campaign to raise awareness about elephant hunting and wildlife smuggling.
We have received support from the government, NGOs and influencers since we celebrated Voices For Momos.
The public campaign was hosted in crowded areas to raise awareness about the illegal wildlife trade. The demand for prohibited wildlife is high in Myanmar, as its wild elephants are being killed every week. —GNLM

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