Cooperation with CTFMR a welcome step to protect children amid conflict

Perspectives

Myanmar has formed a committee to protect children in conflict-ridden areas, in accordance with the new Child Rights Law enacted in 2019, to safeguard the interests of children amid continued strife.
Our country has witnessed armed conflicts for over 70 years, and still, the guns have not been silenced.
The formation of the committee reflects Myanmar’s commitment to ending and preventing six grave violations against children in conflicted areas of Myanmar, which ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict (OPAC).
It is not just our moral obligation to make sure children are safe and secure, but a legal one, too.
All warring parties in Myanmar have a duty to protect children from six violations under international law — killing and maiming of children, recruitment or use of children as soldiers, sexual violence against children, abduction, attacks against schools or hospitals, and denial of humanitarian access to children.
As a legal responsibility, Chapter 17 of the new Child Rights Law is dedicated to protecting children in armed conflicts and states punishments for those who commit crimes against children. The committee implementing the law has been tasked with 10 duties.
The fourth task of the committee is to cooperate and coordinate with UN agencies such as UNICEF, UNDP, and the Country Task Force on Monitoring and Reporting (CTFMR), with a commitment to carrying out the task dutifully.
With the launch of joint efforts with the CTFMR, the steps taken by the Union Government for better protecting our children deserve to be acknowledged by the United Nations.
The Union Government has committed to working with the UN agencies and CTFMR to put in place all the necessary measures to protect children from recruitment and use by warring parties in the country.
We hope that once the work of the committee gathers speed, Myanmar would be removed from the UN’s list of nations with bad images.

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